Charles Grant1

M, #2140, d. 9 October 1847

Family 1

Children
  • Charles Grant1
  • Charles Collins Grant1
  • Charles Grant3
  • Charles Grant+3 b. a 1810, d. b 1851

Family 2

Christiana (?) d. 6 December 1850
Family BackgroundGrant - Klinger Ancestry and Allied Families

KEY EVENTS:

     Charles Grant and Widow Christiana Mills were married on 20 May 1813 in Sandwich (now Windsor), Essex County, Ontario.2 Charles died on Saturday, 9 October 1847.1
     
Copyright Notice
The material on this website is subject to copyright.

Facts – names, dates, and places – cannot be copyrighted; you are
free to copy them.
But the narratives are my creative work product and are copyrighted.
You may copy them for your personal use, but please respect my copyright and do not republish them in any form, including copying them to your tree on Ancestry or elsewhere, unless you have obtained written permission from me.
Many of the images are also copyrighted, and may not be copied without the consent of the copyright holders.

NARRATIVE:

     The record of Charles' marriage to Christiana is the earliest record of him we have been able to find. It is very possible that both of his sons,Charles Grant and Charles Collins Grant, were sons from an earlier marriage.2,3 The marriage record itself further noted that Charles Senior lived in Sandwich at the time of their marriage. Interestingly, the next records found mentioning him suggest an entirely different residence for Charles.2,4,5 On 19 July 1814, Charles leased 200 acres of land on Lake Simcoe's Cook's Bay in North Gwillimbury Township, York County, Ontario. He leased the land from James Roche, a gentleman formerly of York (now Toronto). At the time of the lease, Mr. Roche resided in Queenstown, Lincoln County in the Niagara District. Yet more importantly for us, the lease records that Charles Grant is a merchant trader of Montreal.6


Many Grants from Quebec

     This reference to Charles as a merchant trader from Montreal may provide some clue as to his family origins. Sometime around the 1760s, the fur trade in Canada began to flourish. While the Hudson's Bay Company is the most famous of these enterprises, the North West Company arguably became the most powerful of the fur trading companies for a time. That is until 1811, when the Earl of Selkirk's acquisition of territory along the Red River undermined the expansion of the North West Company, and eventually led to its absorption by the reascendent Hudson's Bay Company.7
     The North West Company had its wilderness headquarters at Fort William on Lake Superior, but its financial headquarters was in Montreal. The history of the North West Company reveals a number of Grants who played both minor and major roles in the development and expansion of the company. A number of them were based at least at some point in their careers in Montreal. It is possible that Charles Grant has some relation to some of these Grants.8 Among the people that may be related to Charles Grant are Charles Grant of Quebec, Charles Grant of Côte Ste. Catherine, William Grant of St. Roch and John Grant of Montreal.9


Activities in North Gwillimbury and Vaughan Townships

     On the 20 July 1814, one day after initiating the lease of the 200 acres on Cook's Bay in North Gwillimbury, Charles actually purchased the property from James Roche for £150. Both the lease and purchase of the property were recorded nearly a year later on 6 June 1815.5,4 On 4 November 1815, Charles, along with Christiana Grant, sold to Thomas Coates, an innkeeper from Vaughan Township, his Lake Simcoe property in North Gwillimbury Township, in Home District, Upper Canada, Canada. The land turned out to be somewhat profitable for him, as he sold it for £250. At the time of the sale, he apparently was an innkeeper in the Home District (now York County).10 On this same day, Charles apparently took the proceeds from the sale of his Lake Simcoe property and purchased from Christian Hendricks, a yeoman farmer from Markham Township, and his wife, Margaret, a 105-acre tract of land in the northeastern portion of Vaughan Township. The property bordered the west side of Yonge Street, and was located on lot 57 in concession 1. According to this land record, Charles resided in the town of York (now Toronto) at the time of the sale.11
     On 15 April 1816, he purchased from Anthony and Mary Wunsh 52 1/2 acres more or less of land located on the south half of the north half of lot 58 in concession 1 in Vaughan Township, in Home District, Upper Canada, Canada. Charles bought the property for £37,10. By the time he became the owner of this land he appears to have given up his former occupations of merchant trader and innkeeper and settled into his role as a yeoman farmer. No future records refer to him as being involved in any other occupation.12 A period of relative quiet ensues in the records after this 1816 land purchase. The next record of Charles we have been able to find is the sale of a mortgage in 1832. On 31 October 1832, Rowland Burr mortgaged to Charles Grant 110 acres of land in the west part of lot 41 in concession 1 of Vaughan Township for the sum of £150. The mortgage was to be repaid to Charles by 1 May 1837 with unspecified interest. As time passes, there will be several more references in the public record to Charles' financial dealings with Burr, the first of those being the discharge of this mortgage, that is record of its payment in full, on 22 March 1837.13,14
     The inception of this mortgage between Burr and Charles Grant was recorded on 10 November 1832. This recording is the first suggestion that Charles had traveled the short distance to King Township and taken up residence there. Every record but one from this point on states that Charles is now a resident of King Township, rather than Vaughan Township. Nevertheless several years apparently pass before any formal record appears of him purchasing land there.13,15 The 29 November 1833 was a busy day for Charles and his wife. On this day they sold three parcels of property they owned. They split the two properties in Vaughan Township that they owned in lots 57 and 58 respectively. The 105 acre property in lot 57 was split into an approximately 103 acre parcel and a 3 acre parcel in the southeast corner. (Somehow he managed to turn a 105 acre piece of land into a 106 acre piece of land!) He and Christiana sold the larger of the two parcels to James Mather for £250, the amount they had originally paid for the entire parcel. The smaller of the two they sold to Matthew Muir, a Vaughan Township innkeeper, for £135. Having disposed of this property now in its entirety, they then sold 33 acres of their approximately 53 acre property in lot 58 to David McKenzie, a yeoman farmer of Vaughan, for the sum of £75, basically double what they had paid for the entire parcel in 1816. This left them with only the 20 acre parcel in the southwest part of this same lot. All of these land transactions, like the earlier mortgage transaction between Charles and Rowland Burr, indicate that Charles and Christiana lived in King Township in 1833.16,17,18 Charles Grantsold to John Stephens the last of his known properties in Vaughan Township, on 11 October 1834.15


Life in King Township

     The first explicit evidence that Charles had moved the very short distance to King Township can be found in a deed dated 3 November 1838, in which he purchases a 40 acres parcel of land in the northeast quarter of Concession 3, Clergy Reserve Lot 2 from Barnes and Lydia Beynon. This deed refers to him as Charles Senior, obviously to avoid any confusion with either of his sons.19 Apparently in 1840, he built a house there which still stands. This house is mentioned in Rural Roots: Pre-Confederation buildings of the York region of Ontario. The author of the book refers to the house as the Charles Grant house, noting that its existing front door, windows and walnut banister are original. Masterfully carved shelves overhang the windows as well as the door. The interior is said to be a mixture of Georgian and Colonial styles. At some point during its history, the house was turned 180 degrees on its foundation, to satisfy the owner's wife's opinion that the front door should not face out onto the barn. Thus today the front door faces north rather than south. This history does not say who the owner of the house was at that time, whether it was Charles Senior or a later owner.20
     Shortly after building the now historic house, Charles and Christiana sold the property to Thomas Beynon of King Township for £125. The transaction took place on 27 December 1841 and was recorded on 28 March 1842. Despite the sale, Charles and Christiana continued to live on the property until Charles' death six years later. According to tax records from 1846, Charles was farming 14 of the 40 acres of land, and owned one milk cow. The property was valued at 20 pounds, and he was taxed 3 pounds, 5 shillings that year.21,22


His Last Years

     Charles Grant left a will on 15 December 1845 in King Township, in Home District, Upper Canada, Canada. Christiana (?) was named executor. Charles Grant and Charles Collins Grant were listed as heirs. He left the entirety of his estate to his wife, excepting one shilling that he left to each of his sons.1 Charles Senior referred to his son, Charles Collins, as the younger of his two sons. He further explained that he had sold the forty acres on which he then lived to Thomas Beynon for 125 pounds. Beynon was to pay the amounts still due Charles to his wife, Christiana, upon his death. Reference in the will is also made to Rowland Burr, Esquire, who apparently still owed Charles £100 despite the discharge of the mortgage that we know of in 1837. An inventory of Charles' estate after his death in 1847 revealed that Burr still owed Charles more than 65 pounds, the bond of 125 pounds owed by Thomas Beynon for the purchase of Charles' land remained wholly unpaid, he had owned a cow worth 4 pounds, and household goods valued at 5 pounds.1 No record of his burial has been found despite a thorough search of cemetery transcriptions from both King and Vaughan Townships.
Last Edited5 Sep 2016

Citations

  1. [S230] Charles Grant, King Township, York County, Upper Canada estate file Folio 468 (Register 9), Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as York County estate file.
  2. [S915] Charles Grant and Christiana Mills marriage, 20 May 1813, in Parish Registers, 1802-1827, St. John's Anglican Church (Sandwich), Public Archives of Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as St. John's Parish Registers.
  3. [S1128] Supposition made by Author (Seattle, Washington) based on the preponderance of evidence. No record definitively establishing parentage has been found.
  4. [S914] North Gwillimbury Township, York County Land Records, Volume 1: 2477, Registrar of Deeds (North), Newmarket, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as North Gwillimbury Deeds.
  5. [S914] North Gwillimbury Township, York County Land Records, Volume 1: 2478, Registrar of Deeds (North), Newmarket, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as North Gwillimbury Deeds.
  6. [S914] North Gwillimbury Township, York County Land Records, Volume 1: 2477, Registrar of Deeds (North), Newmarket, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as North Gwillimbury Deeds. Charles leased the land for five shillings and "one pepper corn if demanded" for interest after one year.
  7. [S916] W. Stewart Wallace, Documents Relating to the North West Company (Toronto: The Champlain Society, 1934), pp. 1-2. Hereinafter cited as The North West Company.
  8. [S916] W. Stewart Wallace, Documents Relating to the North West Company (Toronto: The Champlain Society, 1934), pp. 1. Hereinafter cited as The North West Company.
  9. [S916] W. Stewart Wallace, Documents Relating to the North West Company (Toronto: The Champlain Society, 1934), pp. 448-453. Hereinafter cited as The North West Company.
  10. [S914] North Gwillimbury Township, York County Land Records, Volume 1: 2608, Registrar of Deeds (North), Newmarket, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as North Gwillimbury Deeds.
  11. [S917] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume E-1: 2607, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  12. [S917] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume E-1: 2801, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  13. [S918] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume M: 9292, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  14. [S921] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume S: 13926, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  15. [S920] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume P: 11397, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  16. [S919] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume O: 10354, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  17. [S919] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume O: 10355, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  18. [S919] Old York County (South) Land Records, Volume O: 10371, Registrar of Deeds (South), Toronto, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as Old York County (South) Deeds.
  19. [S922] King Township, York County Land Records, Volume 1: 15712, Registrar of Deeds (North), Newmarket, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as King Township Deeds.
  20. [S619] Mary Byers, Jan Kennedy, Margaret McBurney and The Junior League of Toronto, Rural Roots: Pre-Confederation buildings of the York region of Ontario (Toronto: University of Toronto, 1976), p. 151. Hereinafter cited as Rural Roots.
  21. [S922] King Township, York County Land Records, Volume 1: 19521, Registrar of Deeds (North), Newmarket, Ontario. Hereinafter cited as King Township Deeds.
  22. [S1549] Charles Grant entry, 1846 tax record, King Township, York County, Ontario; microfilm 0207870, items 6-7; Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah. Hereinafter cited as King Township tax record of Charles Grant.